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Pavement Testing - Articles and news items

Innovative and sustainable airfield pavement engineering solutions

Issue 3 2016  •  24 May 2016  •  Halil Ceylan, Kasthurirangan Gopalakrishnan and Sunghwan Kim, from the Institute for Transportation at Iowa State University

With annual enplanements expected to reach 1.2 billion by 2032 it’s important that airports consider sustainable pavement design solutions. Halil Ceylan, Kasthurirangan Gopalakrishnan and Sunghwan Kim, from the Institute for Transportation at Iowa State University, discuss the implications on airside pavement design for large hub airports...

FAA dedicates airport pavement testing facility

Airport news  •  28 August 2015  •  Victoria White

The FAA has dedicated its new National Airport Pavement & Materials Research Centre at the William J. Hughes Technical Centre...

High Tyre Pressure Teston flexible airfield pavement for new aircraft standard – analysis, conclusion and recommendation

Issue 6 2010  •  13 December 2010  •  Cyril Fabre, Head of Airfield Pavement, ICAOAOSWG/ Pavement Subgroup ICCAIA Representative and Camille Saguès, Airfield Pavement Senior Engineer, AIRBUS S.A.S

Further to the ‘High Tyre Pressure Test’ (HTPT) overview presented in Issue 4 2010 of International Airport Review, this article presents test analysis, conclusions and recommendations. Detailed information on test background, facilities and test procedures are all contained in the former issue; therefore, for a better understanding of this second article and for an overall view of the HTPT test, the reader should refer to Issue 4 2010 of International Airport Review.

High tyre pressure test on flexible airfield pavement for new aircraft standard

Issue 4 2010  •  10 August 2010  •  Cyril Fabre, Head of Airfield Pavement, ICAO-AOSWG / Pavement Subgroup ICCAIA representative, AIRBUS S.A.S

With the increasing air traffic demands, the aviation industry has made continuous strides in the past 50 years. As a result, load per wheel (and consequently internal tyre pressure inflation) have gradually increased since the initial FAA policy, which was based on a DC-8 configuration at 158,757 tons (18.8 tons wheel load and an associated internal tyre pressure inflation, Pnz of 13.2 bar/191 PSI ). These increases were driven by airlines’ demand to develop and design highly efficient aircraft with maximum reliability and optimised performances. As a consequence, aircraft components are lighter, particularly landing gear optimisation, to meet payload-range requirements and reduce noise and/or drag during approach phase.

 

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